One Person, One Passport

In 2009, a second biometric feature was added to the travel documents of EU member states. Every travel document carries two fingerprints. The EU has amended its regulation governing standards for security features in travel documents. As a result, parents may no longer add their children to their own passports.

In 2009, a second biometric feature was added to the travel documents of EU member states. Every travel document carries two fingerprints. The EU has amended its regulation governing standards for security features in travel documents. As a result, parents may no longer add their children to their own passports.

Abolition of option of adding children to parents’ passports

On 14 January 2009, the European Parliament passed an amendment to the EU regulation, introducing the 1P-1P principle. 1P-1P stands for ‘one person, one passport’. Parents will no longer have the option, for example by means of a child sticker, of adding their children to their own passports.

The European Parliament has also agreed another amendment to the EU regulation, which exempts children younger than 12 years from the requirement to have their fingerprints stored on a chip in their travel documents. As is known, the EU member states decided in 2009 that travel documents should include fingerprints.

The 1P-1P principle is recommended by the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO), a leading authority in the field of travel documents. This UN body takes the view that the 1P-1P rule will make it easier to establish and verify passport holders’ identities. The EU believes that introducing the new rule will also make it easer to prevent child trafficking and smuggling. In any case, it will be an improvement on the current situation, in which various EU member states issue different types of additions to passports.

From 26 June 2012, the addition of children to their parents’ passports, by means of child stickers or otherwise, will cease to be valid. This is due to a change in the EU regulation governing requirements for travel documents. The regulation has direct effect, overriding the provisions of the Passport Act.

Consequences:

  • From 26 June 2012, it will no longer be possible to add children to the passports of their parent(s) or guardian.
  • On 26 June 2012, all existing additions of children and child stickers will cease to be valid.
  • The expiry of the validity of the additions of children and child stickers on 26 June 2012 will not affect the validity of the passport of the parent(s) or guardian to which they were added.

Children younger than 12 years will be exempt from the requirement to provide fingerprints for storage on the chip in new Dutch passports and identity cards.

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